Introduction

The modern scientific investigation of nervous systems started just over a century ago with the work of Santiago Ramon y Cajal (1). Cajal's neuron doctrine was revolutionary for two main reasons. On the one hand, it showed that, like all the other organs in the body, the brain is constituted by cells. On the other hand, it began to reveal the incredible complexity of the shape of brain cells (glia and, in particular, neurons) and their potential interconnectivity. These findings inspired the...

Brief History Of Computers

What will the twentieth century be remembered for in a thousand years from now Here is a guess the emergence of computers1. Apparently, the impact of computers on our society was underestimated at the very beginning. At their birth, computers (literally meaning calculators) were designated for calculating ballistic trajectories in artillery. Here are several definitions of a computer borrowed from modern online dictionaries 1. A machine for performing calculations automatically (WordNet 1.6,...

References

Role of forebrain cholinergic system in learning and memory relevance to the cognitive deficits of aging and Alzheimer's dementia. Progr Brain Res 1993 98 413-420. 2. Everitt BJ., Robbins TW. Central cholinergic systems and cognition. Annu Rev Psychol 1997 48 649-684. 3. Heimer L, de Olmos J, Alheid GF, Zaborszky L. Perestroika in the basal forebrain opening the border between neurology and psychiatry. Progr Brain Res 1991 87 109-165. 4. Zaborszky L, Pang K, Somogyi J,...

Spatial Orientation

A final item of discussion concerns the issue of the spatial orientation of dendrites. While dendrograms capture a great deal of morphological properties and are sufficient to run single-cell electrophysiological simulations, an important component of dendritic morphology is the occupation of space in three dimensions. In fact, this is one of the most important shape characteristics that neuroanatomists intuitively use in morphological classifications. L-Neuron tackles the problem of dendritic...

Arjen van Ooyen PhD

Arjen van Ooyen is a researcher at the Netherlands Institute for Brain Research. He has a PhD in theoretical neurobiology from the University of Amsterdam. His principal research concerns modeling neural development neurite outgrowth, axon guidance, and axonal competition. Further information can be found on his website at www.anc.ed.ac.uk arjen. Jaap van Pelt received his PhD in Physics in 1978 at the Free University in Amsterdam. His research group, Neurons and Networks, at the Netherlands...

Ruggero Scorcioni bs

Ruggero Scorcioni is the software engineer of the Computational Neuroanatomy Group at the Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study while studying for a PhD in the School of Computational Science at George Mason University. He graduated in electronic engineering from the University of Modena, Italy.

Stephen L Senft PhD

Stephen Senft is interested in visualization of brain anatomy and activity at the cellular level. He began his study of Neuroscience - ' with Steve George at Amherst College, and pursued his graduate study of Neuroscience first at the University of Oregon and later at Washington University, with intervening study in Dan Alkon's laboratory at the MBL. He obtained his Ph.D. in the Woolsey laboratory, with an analysis of the ingrowth of thalamic afferents to mouse somatosensory barrel cortex....

Sybrand Boer Iwema ms

Sybrand Boer-Iwema received an MS in Chemistry from the University of Leiden Netherlands in 2001, spending the last semester of his curriculum as a student intern in the Computational Neuroanatomy Group at the Krasnow Institute for Advanced Study. His interests include neuroscience, computational modeling, and biking. From Computational Neuroanatomy Edited by Giorgio A. Ascoli Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ

Geoffrey J Goodhill PhD

Goodhill has a BSc in Mathematics and Physics from the University of Bristol, an MSc in Artificial Intelligence from the University of Edinburgh, and a PhD in Cognitive Science from the University of Sussex. Following post-doctoral training in computational neuroscience at the University of Edinburgh, Baylor College of Medicine, and the Salk Institute, he joined the faculty of Georgetown University in 1996. He is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Neuroscience.