Hev

FIGURE 3-5 High endothelial venules. A, Light micrograph of an HEV in a lymph node illustrating the tall endothelial cells. (Courtesy of Dr. Steve Rosen, Department of Anatomy, University of California, San Francisco.) B, Expression of L-selectin ligand on HEVs, stained with a specific antibody by the immunoperoxidase technique. (The location of the antibody is revealed by a brown reaction product of peroxidase, which is coupled to the antibody; see Appendix IV for details.) The HEVs are abundant in the T cell zone of the lymph node. (Courtesyof Drs. Steve Rosen and Akio Kikuta, Department of Anatomy, University of California, San Francisco.) C, A binding assay in which lymphocytes are incubated with frozen sections of a lymph node. The lymphocytes (stained dark blue) bind selectively to HEVs. (Courtesy of Dr. Steve Rosen, Department of Anatomy, University of California, San Francisco.) D, Scanning electron micrograph of an HEV with lymphocytes attached to the luminal surface of the endothelial cells. (Courtesy of J. Emerson and T. Yednock, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine. From Rosen SD, and LM Stoolman. Potential role of cell surface lectin in lymphocyte recirculation. In Olden K, and J Parent [eds]. Vertebrate Lectins. Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, 1987.)

Lymph node

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