Pharmacotherapy Targeting Substance Dependence in Dually Diagnosed Populations

Although pharmacotherapies aimed specifically at decreasing alcohol or drug use (e.g., naltrexone, disulfiram) can be efficacious in improving SUD outcomes in non-dually-diagnosed populations, the literature on the use of these medications in dually diagnosed populations is quite thin. Concerns that disulfiram may cause or exacerbate psychosis (Mueser, Noordsy, Fox, & Wolfe, 2003) have contributed to a reluctance to prescribe it in patients with SPMI (Kingsbury & Salzman, 1990). While there have been no controlled studies of disulfiram in populations with alcohol dependence and SPMI, there have been a few published case reports (Brenner, Karper, & Krystal, 1994) and case series (Kofoed, Kania, Walsh, & Atkinson, 1986; Mueser et al., 2003) describing its tolerability and potential benefit for improving alcohol outcomes and hospital-ization rates for those who remain in treatment. Additionally, there is preliminary evidence that naltrexone may improve drinking outcomes in patients with alcohol dependence and schizophrenia (Batki et al., 2002) or major depression (Salloum et al., 1998). The benefit or tolerability of naltrexone in patients with bipolar disorder and alcohol disorders is less clear, based on one case report (Sonne & Brady, 2000).

Beat The Battle With The Bottle

Beat The Battle With The Bottle

Alcoholism is something that can't be formed in easy terms. Alcoholism as a whole refers to the circumstance whereby there's an obsession in man to keep ingesting beverages with alcohol content which is injurious to health. The circumstance of alcoholism doesn't let the person addicted have any command over ingestion despite being cognizant of the damaging consequences ensuing from it.

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